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SUCCESS STORIES AND TESTIMONIALS


Track Your Plaque Members who achieved personal success from personal effort with Track Your Plaque!



  LindyBill: Against All Odds
success
My Story

The irrepressible Track Your Plaque Member, LindyBill, posts this tale of the ups and downs of achieving coronary plaque reversal in the modern age - in an HMO, no less!



LindyBill’s initial struggles and eventual success highlight how to get the job done, even when the doctors around you do their best to booby-trap your best efforts. LindyBill handled it all with grace, despite the fact that he had acquired deeper appreciation for the finer points of coronary plaque reversal than his doctors.  Here is a true life testimonial in his own words... [Read Special Report]

My Success

  • 32% Plaque Reduction

 

  Amy A: A New Plaque Reversal Record!
success
My Story

When we met Amy at age 52, she was at the height of her career. She had started a small business with her husband seven years earlier, and they were now enjoying enormous success.

Amy’s heart scan score was 117. For a woman, this put Amy in the 90th percentile (worst 10% for her age group). The score came as a surprise to her, despite the fact that her brother had his first heart attack at age 48, her mother had a heart attack at age 50. As an entrepreneur with a big success under her belt, perhaps she felt invincible. [Read Special Report]

My Success

  • 63% Plaque Reduction

 

  Neal T. - Dramatic Plaque Reversal
success
My Story

Neal, a 40-year old school principal, went to his doctor because of chest pain. Slender and physically active, at first he refused to believe that it could have represented heart disease. He started to really worry when he had to stop mid-step while coaching basketball.

His primary care physician, skeptical of heart disease, had Neal undergo a simple stress EKG. While it was normal, Neal did experience some of his chest discomfort.  Neal’s primary care physician asked him to undergo a CT heart scan. His score: 339, in the 99th percentile for men in his age group.  [Read Special Report]
My Success

  • 51% Plaque Reversal

 

  Ron P: You Can't Argue with Success!
success
My Story

When Ron first received the result of his heart scan, he started having pain in his chest. He became aware of pounding when he sat still. In fact, he became acutely aware of every little blip or flip of his heart. In short, it kind of made him nuts.

After all, Ron knew for years that he had several substantial abnormalities in his cholesterol panel. Ron’s triglycerides ran as high as 700 mg/dl, HDL as low as 26 mg/dl. So when he had his first heart scan at age 53 and it showed a score of 135, neither Ron nor his doctor were surprised.

Nonetheless, such concrete evidence of potential for heart attack really shook him up. Ron’s dad had experienced his first heart attack at age 52; his second proved fatal. Ron was no stranger to the dangers of heart disease.

I met Ron because of the chest pains. Although the statistical likelihood that a heart scan score of 135 was the culprit for his chest pain was rather small (5%), we had Ron undergo a stress test. It proved normal with no evidence of poor blood flow in any area of the heart. Curiously, just knowing this provided Ron with relief of his symptoms.

We proceeded to study Ron’s lipoprotein patterns more deeply. Not surprisingly, a number of important hidden factors were identified beyond the high triglycerides and low HDL, including a flagrant excess of IDL (the after-meal persistence of dietary fats), small LDL particles, zero large healthy HDL, and lipoprotein(a).

Ron initially took our advice and added high dose fish oil, sharply reduced processed carbohydrates and saturated fats, lost a few pounds, added niacin. But he progressively began to doubt that he would ever change the course of his future and became obsessed with the notion that he was destined to follow the footsteps of his father. He ended up stopping many of the strategies we started, regained the lost weight and more. I urged Ron to get another heart scan. Score: 350, representing a 159% increase over two years, a much greater rate of plaque growth than average. Now we’re starting to get worried.

But then something happened. I’m not sure what internal dialogue Ron had, but he really started to apply himself. He resumed all the changes in lifestyle we discussed, exercised, added vitamin D, took his fish oil, reduced his weight 15 of the 25 lbs we advised, etc. One year later, yet another heart scan. This time, the score: 253, a 28% decrease.

Dr. Davis Comments:

There may be a number of important lessons Ron’s experience might teach us.

One, attitude is everything. Just as we discussed in last month’s newsletter, being optimistic can spell the difference between dropping your score hugely and watching it rise while you watch helplessly. Ron’s change in attitude was undoubtedly a crucial factor.

Two, coronary disease is, for many or perhaps most of us, a very controllable process. Once you have the right tools combined with the proper attitude, dramatic results are possible. For Ron, it was the difference between an extraordinary rate of plaque growth vs. a precipitous amount of reversal.

You can’t argue with success.

My Success

  • 28% Plaque Reduction

 

  Tim T: Success Even with Diabetes
success
My Story

Tim’s diabetes hit him like a truck. At age 62, Tim’s weight dropped unintentionally 25 lbs. over two months. Although he liked the weight loss, he felt awful: exhausted, even when he first got out of bed; lightheaded; and urinating large volumes. He was barely able to function in his job as CEO of a small manufacturing company.

Tim’s primary physician diagnosed diabetes and put him on two medications, one of which was Actos® (pioglitazone) . Within days, Tim felt normal again, though a good deal thinner. But his doctor warned him that the episode he suffered could have become very dangerous, sometimes even resulting in a condition called “hyperosmolar coma”, a state of profound dehydration so severe it results in coma.

Tim took the advice to heart. He got himself a heart scan to see if hidden heart disease was also lurking. His score: 318, in the 80th percentile compared to other men in his age group (approximately 3% annual risk for heart attack).

Tim’s primary physician put him on a statin cholesterol drug (Vytorin®). LDL cholesterol was reduced by the drug to a favorable level of 66 mg/dl, verified by a LDL particle number of 813 nmol/l (Track Your Plaque target <700 nmol/l). His lipoprotein analysis (NMR, Liposcience) on both Vytorin® and Actos® (an unusual diabetes agent in that it partially corrects lipoprotein patterns) also revealed:

• HDL 43 mg/dl, with only 3 mg/dl of effective large HDL
• Small LDL representing 80% of all LDL particles, a severe pattern.

Vitamin D supplementation increased 25-OH vitamin D3 from 22 ng/ml to 54 ng/ml.

We also counseled Tim on reducing processed carbohydrates, wheat products, and increasing reliance on lean proteins, especially raw nuts, and oat products to improve his profile, particularly small LDL.

One year later, Tim’s heart scan was repeated. His score: 244, a 23% reduction.

Dr. Davis Comments

Last month, we profiled another Track Your Plaque participant who also had adult diabetes yet dropped his heart scan score. Tim is another diabetic who beat the odds.

Conventional medical wisdom is that diabetes represents a profound risk for heart disease. Rates of plaque growth of 50% per year are not uncommon when causes remain uncorrected. These two Track Your Plaque participants are examples of how this is not necessarily true if the proper steps are taken. Not only did they diminish risk, they reversed coronary atherosclerotic plaque―dramatically.

Tim’s case is somewhat more complicated in that he was taking a diabetes medication that may have influenced lipoprotein patterns. This is, of course, not a strategy that should be used by non-diabetics.

But the lesson learned from Tim’s case is that diabetes is not necessarily a death sentence from heart disease, as conventional medicine dictates. Tim’s substantial reduction in heart scan score will translate into a profound reduction in his risk for heart attack, as well as dramatically slashing likelihood of ever needing a heart procedure.

My Success

  • 23% Plaque Reduction

 

  Dr. Sam L: A Doctor Finds a Better Way
success
My Story

Dr. Sam L. is a 61-year old physician. Sam’s father had a heart attack at age 55, so Sam had tracked his own cholesterol panel religiously, up to several times a year. His LDL ranged between 130–170 mg/dl, HDL 41–48 mg/dl. Sam prided himself on remaining slender—certainly more slender than many of his colleagues—and fit. He felt wonderful during his three time-per-week exercise efforts. He’d also asked a cardiology colleague to perform a nuclear stress test every year, and he’d consistently passed all of them.

Sam was therefore pretty shaken, even shocked, to learn of his CT heart scan score of 617. He immediately put himself on Lipitor® to reduce LDL cholesterol. On the drug, his LDL ranged from 85–100 mg/dl.

After a year and a half, Sam got himself another heart scan score: 744, a 20% increase. His cardiologist colleague dismissed the result. “What difference does it make? Your stress test is still normal. I don’t think that you don’t need a cath yet [heart catheterization]. We could do one if it would help settle your mind.”

Sam wasn’t sure what to make of all this. So he took the easy way out: he pushed it out of his mind and went about his busy schedule. One year later and another heart scan: score 880, another 18% increase.

Sam sought an opinion from another cardiologist. This cardiologist reassured him and suggested another nuclear stress test. “We want to catch it in time!” he declared. That’s when Sam realized that his cardiologist friends had no insight whatsoever into how to manage his escalating score and heart attack risk. They only knew how to watch and wait for the time when procedures were justified. So Sam enrolled in the Track Your Plaque program.

Among the patterns Sam showed on his enrollment lipid/lipoprotein analysis (partially corrected on Lipitor®):

• HDL cholesterol 47 mg/dl (TYP target ≤60 mg/dl)
• Small LDL particles 65% of total LDL (TYP target <10% of total) LDL)
• Triglycerides 96 mg/dl (TYP target ≤60 mg/dl)
• Excess VLDL (TYP target: 0 mg/dl)
• Vitamin D 30 ng/ml (TYP target >50 ng/ml)

We showed Sam how to raise HDL and reduce small LDL particles using diet and niacin, drop triglycerides and VLDL using omega-3 fatty acids, and raise vitamin D with vitamin D supplements. He also brought his blood pressure into normal range using a combination of nutrition, modest weight loss of 7 lbs, and one medication.

Another year later, Sam’s heart scan score: 719.9, an 18% decrease!

Dr. Davis Comments

Since then, Dr. L. has become a vocal advocate for the Track Your Plaque approach. I suspect that he came within months of a heart attack or truly requiring a heart catheterization (that is, a procedure necessary for real reasons, not for the financial enrichment of his cardiologist friend, nor just for peace of mind).

Dr. L. is living proof of the limited effectiveness of conventional answers to heart disease prevention. Taking Lipitor® and following a “heart healthy diet” yielded 18–20% yearly increases in his score. If that were your bank account or mutual fund, you’d be hob-nobbing with Bill Gates within a few years. But it’s coronary plaque. That rate of growth is simply not sustainable for any length of time without catastrophe.

The majority of physicians regard prevention of heart disease as “fluff” and not worth their effort. Procedures yield quick answers and lots of financial incentive. But that approach makes no sense, particularly when heart disease prevention can truly be powerful.

Only when he was introduced to the Track Your Plaque concepts did Sam manage to put a halt to his rapidly growing plaque and dramatically turn it around.

My Success

  • 18% Plaque Reduction

 

  Grady L: An Attorney Wins the Big One
success
My Story

Dr. Sam L. is a 61-year old physician. Sam’s father had a heart attack at age 55, so Sam had tracked his own cholesterol panel religiously, up to several times a year. His LDL ranged between 130–170 mg/dl, HDL 41–48 mg/dl. Sam prided himself on remaining slender—certainly more slender than many of his colleagues—and fit. He felt wonderful during his three time-per-week exercise efforts. He’d also asked a cardiology colleague to perform a nuclear stress test every year, and he’d consistently passed all of them.

Sam was therefore pretty shaken, even shocked, to learn of his CT heart scan score of 617. He immediately put himself on Lipitor® to reduce LDL cholesterol. On the drug, his LDL ranged from 85–100 mg/dl.

After a year and a half, Sam got himself another heart scan score: 744, a 20% increase. His cardiologist colleague dismissed the result. “What difference does it make? Your stress test is still normal. I don’t think that you don’t need a cath yet [heart catheterization]. We could do one if it would help settle your mind.”

Sam wasn’t sure what to make of all this. So he took the easy way out: he pushed it out of his mind and went about his busy schedule. One year later and another heart scan: score 880, another 18% increase.

Sam sought an opinion from another cardiologist. This cardiologist reassured him and suggested another nuclear stress test. “We want to catch it in time!” he declared. That’s when Sam realized that his cardiologist friends had no insight whatsoever into how to manage his escalating score and heart attack risk. They only knew how to watch and wait for the time when procedures were justified. So Sam enrolled in the Track Your Plaque program.

Among the patterns Sam showed on his enrollment lipid/lipoprotein analysis (partially corrected on Lipitor®):

• HDL cholesterol 47 mg/dl (TYP target ≤60 mg/dl)
• Small LDL particles 65% of total LDL (TYP target <10% of total) LDL)
• Triglycerides 96 mg/dl (TYP target ≤60 mg/dl)
• Excess VLDL (TYP target: 0 mg/dl)
• Vitamin D 30 ng/ml (TYP target >50 ng/ml)

We showed Sam how to raise HDL and reduce small LDL particles using diet and niacin, drop triglycerides and VLDL using omega-3 fatty acids, and raise vitamin D with vitamin D supplements. He also brought his blood pressure into normal range using a combination of nutrition, modest weight loss of 7 lbs, and one medication.

Another year later, Sam’s heart scan score: 719.9, an 18% decrease!

Dr. Davis Comments

Since then, Dr. L. has become a vocal advocate for the Track Your Plaque approach. I suspect that he came within months of a heart attack or truly requiring a heart catheterization (that is, a procedure necessary for real reasons, not for the financial enrichment of his cardiologist friend, nor just for peace of mind).

Dr. L. is living proof of the limited effectiveness of conventional answers to heart disease prevention. Taking Lipitor® and following a “heart healthy diet” yielded 18–20% yearly increases in his score. If that were your bank account or mutual fund, you’d be hob-nobbing with Bill Gates within a few years. But it’s coronary plaque. That rate of growth is simply not sustainable for any length of time without catastrophe.

The majority of physicians regard prevention of heart disease as “fluff” and not worth their effort. Procedures yield quick answers and lots of financial incentive. But that approach makes no sense, particularly when heart disease prevention can truly be powerful.

Only when he was introduced to the Track Your Plaque concepts did Sam manage to put a halt to his rapidly growing plaque and dramatically turn it around.

My Success

  • 18% Plaque Reduction

 

  Merrill C: Age No Barrier to Success
success
My Story

I seriously underestimated Merrill from the moment I met her. At 73 years old, standing a grandmotherly 5 feet tall, but weighing 230 lbs., I immediately judged Merrill to be an undisciplined woman, not the least bit interested in health. Boy, was I wrong.

But Merrill did strike me with her big smile stretching from ear to ear. She was, after all, here to talk about heart disease, a subject that makes most people anxious, nauseated, even angry. Yet here was this wonderfully upbeat woman, eager to hear what I had to say about her high heart scan score of 822.

This was in contrast to Merrill’s husband, John. I met John just two days after his wife, for the same reason. John’s heart scan score:1392.

But John’s reaction was entirely different from his wife’s. He was trembling, sweating, so nervous that he was barely able to comprehend our conversation.

Both underwent the same process: stress tests (due to their high scores). Merrill’s was normal; John’s showed a small area of poor flow but insufficient to prompt any further action such as heart catheterization. Husband and wife both had lipoproteins analyzed and, predictably, both had extensive abnormalities. (John’s pattern was principally characterized by low HDL and small LDL, while Merrill had small LDL and lipoprotein (a). Track Your Plaque followers will immediately recognize that Merrill’s pattern was a more difficult one. )

Fast-forward one year. On this meeting, Merrill and John came to the office together to discuss the results of their 2nd heart scans. John characteristically sat nervously, anticipating bad news. Merrill sat undaunted and unaffected by her husband’s jitteriness.

“Give me the bad news, doc,” John spat, barely able to look me in the eye. Merrill’s smile faded for just a second. She said, “Come on, John. Don’t be so glum.” She then looked me straight in the eye and bravely declared, “If the doctor says it’s bad, he’s going to tell us what we should do next.”

As it turned out, John’s 2nd heart scan score was 1533, a 10% increase. Merrill’s score: 768, 6.5% decrease.

Granted, Merrill tried harder over the course of the year. She’d lost 20 lbs. to John’s 3 lb gain. She managed to maintain a modest walking program, while John watched football. Merrill, though she indulged during the holidays, for the most part made healthy food choices but watched while John refused to change old unhealthy eating habits.

I believe that I could have predicted—right from the start—which of the two, Merrill or John, was likely to succeed in gaining control and reversing coronary plaque. While John struggled with the internal demons in his head that prevented him from adopting new healthy habits, seeing them as interfering with “his way”, Merrill openly embraced any reasonable new idea that held promise for improving health. John’s resentful, frightened attitude made it tough for him to get up and be active, or to resist food temptations. Merrill’s smiling, can-do attitude allowed her to accept change.

Dr. Davis Comments:

The results speak for themselves. After 45 years of marriage, I suppose that even an incurable optimist like Merrill would quit hoping that her pessimistic husband would learn from his mistakes.

I tell the story of this interesting couple to help you see what a difference attitude makes. Is it Merrill’s willingness to change, her energy for adopting new eating and exercise habits, or her optimism that made the difference? After all, both Merrill and John achieved similar values in lipoproteins after their year on the program, though Merrill did have the tougher-to-control lipoprotein(a). Yet Merrill achieved what previously had been thought to be impossible: she reversed her coronary atherosclerotic plaque, while John simply managed to slow growth.

I won’t pretend to have the final answer, but I think that this couple provides an example of how an optimistic attitude, for whatever reason, yields distinct advantages in conquering heart disease that may not be fully reproducible just by taking medication or supplements. Optimism may dissolve the hurdles of resistance, provide more energy to overcome obstacles, or there may simply be something “magical” about being happy. I don’t know which aspect of optimism makes it distinctly advantageous, but I have no doubt that it does indeed help you succeed.

My Success

  • 6.5% Plaque Reduction
  • 20 lb weight loss

 

  Richard N: Initial Disappointment Followed by Success
success
My Story

I’ve always been nervous about my heart because my father had a heart attack at age 53 and died at 64. Here I was at age 54 and I really wanted to know if I was going to follow in my dad’s footsteps. My father was a smoker with hypertension and one hell of a temper.

My first heart scan showed a score of 392. I was taking Zocor® for my high LDL cholesterol. I have always been very active and exercised regularly. I was trained as a dancer growing up and have always been very careful about my eating habits for as long as I can remember. I exercised at the YMCA almost every day. I smoked for a very short time my senior year in high school and in college. After my father’s open heart surgery he showed me his scar and I immediately quit. I’ve always taken a handful of vitamins and supplements.  I was among the first people to enroll in the Track Your Plaque program back in 2001. Despite Zocor®, several other abnormalities were identified including small LDL cholesterol particles and a borderline low HDL. They showed me how to correct these patterns and added fish oil, l-arginine, and other nutritional strategies to correct the causes of my plaque.

The second scan I had showed a 19% increase. I was disappointed but not defeated. We further improved my program to the point, for instance, that my HDL was around 80 mg! However, two additional scans in as many years showed anywhere from 18–22% per year plaque growth. My heart scan score peaked at a high of 832.  To say the least, I was demoralized, frightened, and close to giving up. However, based on some new data, I was asked to add vitamin D and some other strategies to my program. Another scan six months later finally showed success: an 8% drop!

The Track Your Plaque staff have told me that my case is among the toughest they’ve ever seen. I’m glad I stuck with it.  My best advice to anyone would be to know your family history, and understand that if you do not take care of your self nobody else will. You have to exercise, listen to your body and follow your instincts. If you suspect that you may have a problem, you probably do. I will be 59 years old in February and look forward to many more quality years in my life. There's still lots left to do.

Richard N., age 58

My Success

  • 8% Plaque Reduction

 

  Joe K: Beating Stress with Success
success
My Story

Joe fidgeted during our entire first meeting. As we talked, I began to understand why he was so anxious.

Life had recently thrown Joe several curve-balls: First, a series of new responsibilities were thrust on him as plant manager at his workplace, changes that doubled his stress level which had been high to begin with. Second, his heart scan score of 278, which shocked him, since three stress tests over the past seven years had all been normal. Third, once he learned of his heart scan score, he stopped smoking the pack and a half of cigarettes he’d smoked for 30 years since age 27. He was now in the midst of unbearable nicotine cravings.

On the bright side, the added stress at work caused Joe to consider finally taking his retirement, something he’d been contemplating for the past two years.

At 5 foot 8 inches and 197 lbs., Joe was by no means obese. But he did have a prominent abdomen. His primary doctor had diagnosed adult diabetes two years earlier and prescribed oral diabetes medication. On learning of Joe’s heart scan score, his doctor immediately added a cholesterol drug.

When I met Joe, he was clearly prepared for either more of the same, i.e., several prescriptions, or a trip to the hospital. But, instead, we began with a lipoprotein analysis (NMR). This showed (while on Vytorin, a combination cholesterol drug):

Small LDL: comprising 90% of all LDL particles.
HDL 49 mg/dl: While not terrible and even above average for a male (42 mg/dl), still below the Track Your Plaque target of 60 mg/dl.
Lipoprotein(a) 103.5 nmol/l: Moderately high.
C-reactive protein 1.7 mg/l: Reflecting hidden inflammation.

Despite Joe’s diabetes, his triglycerides were just slightly above our target (≤60 mg/dl) at 88 mg/dl, likely due to the triglyceride-reducing effect of his diabetes medications.

Note that Joe showed the dreaded combination of lipoprotein(a), or Lp(a), and small LDL. This is probably the highest risk combination possible. And, of course, Joe’s a guy who smoked for 30 years, making it even worse, and now had diabetes. That’s a really bad profile of risk.

I reassured Joe that the smartest move he could have possibly have made was to stop smoking altogether, once and for all. We discussed some ways to deal with the anxiety and nicotine cravings.

It was clear that, despite being just a few pounds over his ideal weight, it was enough to generate diabetes, small LDL, and a borderline low HDL. So I urged Joe to drop from 197 lbs to 165–170 lbs. He would best accomplish this by reducing, even temporarily eliminating, the amount of processed carbohydrates he ate, particularly wheat products. He also added 45 minutes of walking every day, along with dance lessons with his wife.

I asked Joe to add niacin, fish oil, and vitamin D sufficient to raise his blood level to 50 ng/ml.

Twelve months later, Joe returned to the office. He was barely recognizable: his face glowed with pride over the 22 lbs of weight loss he’d accomplished. His enthusiasm was barely containable, stumbling over his words as he recited all the new projects he’d undertaken in the months since he’d taken his retirement.

His basic lipids were spectacular, all at the Track Your Plaque goal of 60:60:60. His blood sugar was normal with only one diabetes medication remaining, and his primary doctor was considering discontinuing this, as well. It was a perfect time for another heart scan.

Joe’s score: 264, a 5% decrease.

Dr. Davis Comments:

I’ve seen it too many times: Someone works for 30 or 40 years, retires, and then the “big one” hits: a heart attack that disrupts life just as you’re about to begin enjoying all the things you’ve worked for. Next come hospitals stays, heart procedures, and an uncertain future. Add the numerous medications necessary after heart attack, the incapacity that stems from any heart damage incurred, and the emotional trauma of a potential near-death experience. That’s no way to begin a retirement.

Instead, Joe seized control of his heart disease and diabetes. He transformed a disastrous profile of risk for heart attack to a benign pattern essentially devoid of risk. By reducing his heart scan score and minimizing, even eliminating, his diabetic patterns, Joe’s prognosis for future health is immeasurably better than it might have been.

My Success

  • 5% Plaque Reduction

 

  Lisa U: Good Cholesterol No Guarantee Against Heart Disease
success
My Story

My name is Lisa. I'm a 43-year old mother and wife. Because I work in a health care field, I've been attentive to health and fitness ever since I was a teenager. I'd always assumed that my health was perfect.

Then my father died unexpectedly of a heart attack at age 59.  A little after my father's death, my older brother (47 years old) developed severe pains in his chest and had to urgently get two stents in his coronary arteries.

I saw the handwriting on the wall. But when my doctor saw my cholesterol numbers—LDL cholesterol 64, HDL cholesterol 74—he said that I'd escaped the genetics of my father and brother and that I had nothing to worry about. He said that, as long as I didn't smoke and continued to pay attention to health, I'd have nothing to worry about from heart attack.

So I bought myself a heart scan. My score: 447, in the worst 1% of women my age. In fact, the cardiologist at the heart scan center said my score was among the highest he'd ever seen in a pre-menopausal female. At first, I thought my heart scan was a death sentence and that a future like my family was inevitable and unavoidable. Not true! That's where the Track Your Plaque program comes in. They showed me how to use my heart scan to begin a powerful program of heart attack prevention. Without getting a heart scan and without the help from the Track Your Plaque program, I would have followed in the footsteps of my Dad and brother. Instead, I continue to feel great and carry on my life without heart attack and without needing major heart procedures.
My Success

  • Safeguard against family history of heart disease

 

  Peter Carpenter and Dr. Jane Shaw
success
My Story

I am the former Executive Director of the Stanford University Medical Center and painfully aware of what it takes to change patterns of practice. Most physicians are not aware of the value of heart scans or how to interpret the resulting calcium scores so, as is often the case, the responsibility for health care devolves to the patient. Your book (Track Your Plaque) is an absolutely essential tool for anybody who wants to take charge of their cardiovascular health—THANK YOU. I have dramatically altered my prevention program based on your book.

My Success

  • Testimonial to prevention

 

  Judy H: Heart Disease Stopped in Its Tracks
success
My Story

I first became concerned about my health when my husband was diagnosed with coronary disease in his mid-50s. I also didn’t know any details of the medical history of my biological father. So getting a heart scan meant peace of mind for me.

I’m 5’ 5” and 118 pounds. I’m a jogger (12–15 miles a week) and have felt wonderful. I love my job (I’m an executive for a local firm). My marriage is wonderful. In short, my life is fine and has no more than the usual dose of stress. The result of my first heart scan alarmed me. My score was 357 and I was told that I was in the 99th percentile, meaning that my score was in the worst 1% of women my age. My doctor initially told me to ignore it, since a nuclear stress test was normal. My cholesterol panel was good with an LDL cholesterol of 86 and HDL of 71.  I wasn’t happy with this approach. I was worried that I was already exercising and ate healthy, yet I had plaque.

I’m grateful that I found out about Dr. Davis’ Track Your Plaque program. They advised me to make a number of changes in lifestyle, many of which were natural items like soy protein, oat bran, and fish oil.  After one year of treatment and another heart scan, I am happy to report that we are on the right track as the scan showed no increase in score.

Judy H., age 55
My Success

  • Plaque growth halted

 

DISCLAIMER: For reasons of privacy (see HIPAA PRIVACY NOTICE below), names, photos, and certain medical data may have been changed.  These changes result in dramatizations that attempt to approximate the conditions under which participants achieved success as closely as possible without revealing their identity.  As personal medical conditions are highly variable and can change rapidly, no claim can be made as to the applicability of the results of any single participant to the general population.
HIPAA PRIVACY NOTICE: Track Your Plaque follows all federal HIPAA laws regarding patient information confidentiality. Accordingly, all personal identifying information in the Success Stories has been changed to protect the privacy of our members except in instances in which permission to publish personal information was expressly authorized. All "Success Story" CT calcium score data has been validated by third-party, independent CT scan clinics and is on file at Track Your Plaque, LLC.
SUCCESS STORY CRITERIA: Members wishing to tell their "Success Story" can contact Track Your Plaque via e-mail. To be considered, you must be able to verify, via CT scan, either a reduction in CT calcium score, zero increase in score, or a reduction in score rate of growth at or below 10% per year. Track Your Plaque will not publish any personal identifying information without your express written permission.  Submission of a photograph is not required.

 


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